2015-12-16 / Front Page

MDEA finds suspected meth lab in Buxton

By TAMMY WELLS
Senior Staff Writer


Agents from MDEA sift through the garbage they recovered from the site of a suspected meth lab in Buxton Tuesday. The trash was removed from outside the house and transported to the Buxton Public Works facility for examination. 
SUBMITTED PHOTO/Maine Public Safety Agents from MDEA sift through the garbage they recovered from the site of a suspected meth lab in Buxton Tuesday. The trash was removed from outside the house and transported to the Buxton Public Works facility for examination. SUBMITTED PHOTO/Maine Public Safety BUXTON — The discovery of a suspected meth lab at a Thompson Road home Tuesday means so far, Maine drug agents have dealt with an average of slightly more than one a week since January.

The discovery of a suspected lab at 125 Thompson Road was the 53rd this year, according to Maine Public Safety Spokesman Steve McCausland. Last month, Maine Drug Enforcement agents searched a property in Wells. That search was the 45th response by drug agents.

So far, no one has been charged in connection with either the Wells or Buxton investigations.

McCausland on Tuesday said the search team at 125 Thompson Road found trash outside the home allegedly containing evidence of methamphetamine manufacturing. They moved the trash to the parking lot of the Buxton Public Safety building for examination, and then prepared to search the home.

According to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, discovery by law enforcement of methamphetamine labs in Maine has grown steadily over the past several years. The federal DEA’s statistics show the discovery of 33 labs in 2014, 22 in 2013, 11 in 2012, six in 2010 and four in 2009.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse says methamphetamine is easily made with relatively inexpensive, over-the-counter ingredients such as pseudoephedrine, a common ingredient in cold medications.

The Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act of 2005 requires retailers of non-prescription products containing pseudoephedrine, ephedrine or phenylpropanolamine to place these products behind the counter or in a locked cabinet. Consumers must show identification and sign a logbook for each purchase, according to the U.S. DEA.

Components that make up meth are considered volatile, and agents use protective gear to examine suspected labs.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse says shortterm effects of meth include increased wakefulness and physical activity and a decrease in appetite. As well, the NIDA said use of meth can cause cardiovascular problems, increased blood pressure and more. Long term use can cause addiction, paranoia, hallucinations, changes in brain structure and function, memory loss, aggressive or violent behavior and a host of other ailments.

— Senior Staff Writer Tammy Wells can be contacted at 324-4444 (local call in Sanford) or 282-1535, ext. 327 or twells@journaltribune.com.

Return to top